Students

Hannah Farrell

Office: Anatomy 201:
Hannah is interested in the functional morphology and evolution of the hominin shoulder girdle. Her dissertation work aims to explore locomotor adaptation in the australopithecines via an integrative form-function study of hominoid clavicle morphology.
Advisor(s):
Zeresenay Alemseged

Samantha Gartner

Office: Culver 101:
Sam takes an integrative approach to studying fish skull movement in 3-dimensions, using wrasses (family Labridae) as her model system, and exploring how ligaments function in fish skulls, to add to our understanding of the biomechanics of fish feeding.
Advisor(s):
Mark Westneat
Ishaan Ghosh, IB doctoral student

Ishaan Ghosh

Office: Culver 405a:
I am interested in how complex neurobiological structures develop and function. I believe cephalopods may be conducive models for such research due to their evolutionary divergence and the distributed nature of their nervous systems. 

Jenks Hehmeyer

Office: CLSC 301:
I research the evolution of animal development, with a focus on gene regulatory network (GRN) evolution, early animal evolution, and functional 3D genome architecture.
Advisor(s):
Heather Marlow

Emily Hillan

Office: Culver 106:
I investigate how skeletal morphologies change in evolution. I incorporate data from the fossil record to determine what anatomical adaptations have occurred, and developmental data to probe how these changes might have happened.
Advisor(s):
Neil Shubin

Laura Hunter

Office: Anatomy 201:
constructing a valid model of the last common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees, by incorporating comparative functional morphology across extinct and extant hominoids
Advisor(s):
Zeresenay Alemseged
Evan Johnson-Ransom, IB doctoral student

Evan Johnson-Ransom

Office: Culver 405a:
I am interested in studying the functional morphology and feeding behavior of dinosaurs, particularly the meat-eating theropod dinosaurs such as T. rex, Spinosaurus, and Allosaurus.
Koray Kasan, IB doctoral student

Koray Kasan

Office: Culver 405a:
I am interested in studying the evolution of gene regulatory networks in the context of early embryonic development.

Maddie Kelly

Office: Anatomy 201:
Understanding spatial variability and temporal shifts in early hominin paleoecology by integrating diverse data such as stable isotopes and faunal ecomorphology to describe past environmental conditions.
Advisor(s):
Zeresenay Alemseged
Peishu Li

Peishu Li

Office: Anatomy 306:
I am broadly interested in the origin and evolution of the mammalian feeding system. I am currently investigating the evolutionary transformation of the hyoid bones, and the impact of different hyoid morphotypes on swallowing biomechanics.
Advisor(s):
Zhe-Xi Luo, Callum Ross